State Licensing Laws

 

OperatorHQ.com shares some great insight related to Do Crane Operators Need A License?

 

You might be wondering what is the difference between a license and a certification; well, they are two distinct credentials that you might need to consider. Certification is the proof by which you qualify as having the set of proper skills required for the job. License is the government’s permission of allowing you to practice or demonstrate your set of specialized skills in carrying out the tasks of the job.”

 

Also of interest: State and Local Requirements for Crane Operator Certification (Table format)

 

 

GREEN Text = Dave’s article content for each state (suggested)

 

State Licensing Requirements

 

California:

 

§5006.1. Mobile Crane and Tower Crane-Operator Qualifications and Certification. [official text of regulation]

 

Subchapter 7. General Industry Safety Orders

Group 13. Cranes and Other Hoisting Equipment

Article 98. Operating Rules

https://www.dir.ca.gov/title8/5006_1.html

 

California is sort of unique. Unlike Hawaii that requires you to become certified through a group like NCCCO and then get licensed through the HMOAB (a double-requirement) CA only requires operators to become certified. The licensure requirement kicks in when someone wants to become authorized to inspect/certify cranes. It’s weird that NCCCO has CA listed as requiring operator licensure on their website.

Cal/OSHA created th
e
Crane Unit to govern and regulate licensing of crane inspectors and companies that want to be authorized to inspect cranes.

 

CA Index of Permits, Licenses, Certifications and Registrations.

§1618.1. Operator Qualification and Certification.

The only way a crane operator in CA can skip being certified at a national level by a group like NCCCO, is if:

(1) When a non-military government entity issues operator licenses for equipment covered under this Article, and that government licensing program meets the requirements of subsections (c)(2) and (b)(1)(C) and (D) of this section, the equipment operator shall be licensed by that government entity for operation of equipment within that entity's jurisdiction.”

 

For example, let’s say that the City of Sacramento, (or State of California) decides to become accredited through NCAA, allowing them to issue their own mobile crane certifications. In order to become accredited, they would first need to demonstrate compliance with all of the same Fed OSHA requirements (like NCCCO had to do). Those requirements include:

 

“(b) Option (1): Certification by an accredited crane operator certifying entity.

(1) Qualifications. The employer shall only permit operators who have a valid certificate of competency (certificate) issued in accordance with this section by an Accredited Certifying Entity for the type of crane to be used to operate a crane covered by this section. Certificates shall be issued to operators who:

(C) Pass a written examination developed, validated, and administered in accordance with the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing (Copyright 1999) published jointly by the Joint Committee of the American Educational Research Association, the American Psychological Association, and the National Council in Measurement in Education. The exam shall test knowledge and skills identified as necessary for safe crane operations and shall, at a minimum, include the following:

1. Operational characteristics and controls, including characteristic and performance questions appropriate to the crane type for which qualification is sought;

2. Emergency control skills, such as a response to fire, power line contact, loss of stability, or control malfunction;

3. A demonstration of basic arithmetic skills necessary for crane operation and the ability to read and comprehend the crane manufacturer's operation and maintenance instruction materials, including load capacity information (load charts) for the crane for which certification is sought;

4. Knowledge of chapters 5-0 through 5-3 of The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) B30.5-2000 and B30.5a-2002 Addenda to the standard for mobile and locomotive cranes or chapters 4-0 through 4-3 of the ASME B30.4-1996 standard for portal, tower, and pedestal cranes or Chapter 3-3 of the ASME B 30.3-1996 standard for Construction Tower Cranes, depending on the type of crane(s) the operator intends to operate.

5. Procedures for preventing and responding to power line contact.

6. Technical knowledge applicable to:

(i) The suitability of the supporting ground and surface to handle expected loads.

(ii) Site hazards.

(iii) Site access.

(D) Pass a “hands-on” examination to demonstrate proficiency in operating the specific type of crane, which at a minimum shall include the following:

1. Ability to recognize, from visual and auditory observation, the items listed in Section 1613.4 (shift inspection).

2. Operational and maneuvering skills.

3. Application of load chart information.

4. Application of safe shut-down and securing procedures.

(c) Option (2): Licensing by a government entity.

(1) For purposes of this section, a government licensing department/office that issues operator licenses for operating equipment covered by this standard is considered a government accredited crane operator testing organization if the criteria in subsection (c)(2) of this section are met.

(2) Licensing criteria.

(A) The requirements for obtaining the license include passing a physical examination and a substance abuse test as prescribed in subsections (b)(1)(A) and (B), and an assessment, by written and practical tests, of the operator applicant regarding, at a minimum, the knowledge and skills listed in subsections (b)(1)(C) and (D) of this section.

(B) The testing meets industry recognized criteria for written testing materials, practical examinations, test administration, grading, facilities/equipment and personnel.

(C) The government authority that oversees the licensing department/office, has determined that the requirements in subsections (c)(2)(A) and (B) of this section have been met.

(D) The licensing department/office has testing procedures for re-licensing designed to ensure that the operator continues to meet the requirements in subsection (c)(2)(A).”

 

That operator needs to understand though, that certification will only be good if used inside the City of Sacramento (or State of California), because that is the jurisdiction. If that operator wanted to be certified to operate a mobile crane outside city/state limits, they would need to be certified at a national level through a group like NCCCO.

 

Shortly after the adoption of this regulation, on June 2, 2005,  Len Welsh, Acting Chief of Cal OSHA issued a regulatory alert letter to AGC (Associated General Contractors of America) California chapter, explaining enforcement of this new rule. Included in his letter is a valuable F.A.Q. that helps to make sense of the law.

 

 

 

Connecticut:

 

Connecticut’s General Statute chapter 539 discusses the regulations surrounding crane operator certification and individuals who want to operate hoisting equipment. In particular, Sec. 29-223a. Hoisting equipment operator's license. Apprentice's certificate of registration which states:

 

(a) No person shall engage in, practice or offer to perform the work of a hoisting equipment operator, except as provided in subsection (b) of this section, who is not the holder of a valid crane operator's license or hoisting equipment operator's license issued by the board. Each licensed hoisting equipment operator shall carry his or her license on his or her person when operating hoisting equipment. No person may engage in, practice or perform the work of a hoisting equipment operator apprentice unless he or she has obtained a certificate of registration from the board. An apprentice's certificate may be issued for the performance of work of a hoisting equipment operator for the purpose of training, provided such work may be performed only under the direct supervision of a licensed hoisting equipment operator and is in compliance with the provisions of section 29-224c.

(b) The provisions of this section shall not apply to: (1) Engineers under the jurisdiction of the United States, (2) engineers or operators employed by public utilities or industrial manufacturing plants, (3) any person operating either a bucket truck or a digger derrick designed and used for an electrical generation, electrical transmission, electrical distribution, electrical catenary or electrical signalization project, if such person: (A) Holds a valid limited electrical line contractor or journeyman's license issued pursuant to chapter 393 or any regulation adopted pursuant to said chapter, or (B) has engaged in the installation of electrical line work for more than one thousand hours, or (C) has enrolled in or has graduated from a federally recognized electrical apprenticeship program, (4) persons engaged in the recreational boating or fishing industry, except when engaged in construction-related work, or in agriculture or arboriculture, or (5) persons engaged in activities, or using equipment, excluded under section 29-221a.”

What is this board, and how does someone who wants to operate a crane or hoisting equipment in the state of Connecticut satisfy the regulatory requirements to be issued a license?

Sec. 29-222. Crane Operators Examining Board and Sec. 29-223. Board powers and duties. Examinations. Regulations provide explanation.

This five member Examining Board is made up of Connecticut residents appointed by the State Governor subject to the provisions of section 4-9a. One member shall be an employee of the Department of Administrative Services, one member shall be a crane operator having at least ten years of experience, one member shall represent the interests of crane owners and two members shall be public members. Board members are not compensated for their services.

October 1, 2012 the state of Connecticut issues updated requirements concerning crane operation. Several items are defined through this update. Connecticut, announces that it will:

        ‘adopt OSHA's standards governing training and supervision of apprentices operating cranes and hoisting equipment.’

        ‘Also, beginning October 1, 2014, it (1) outlines standards applicants for a crane or hoisting equipment operator license must meet and (2) require such operators to be retested every four years before their license is renewed.’

        It then goes on to say that ‘Effective October 1, 2012, the act increases, from $1,000 to $3,000, the maximum civil fine the Crane Board may impose on crane or hoisting equipment owners or operators who violate the laws or regulations governing them.’

 

Apply for a Crane Operator License, Registration, Renewal and Re-Testing

The above link is very helpful in understanding the license application process for crane operators in Connecticut. From here, employers/supervisors can download the form required to submit, indicating that their employee is currently receiving training in the manner required by the State of Connecticut Crane Operators Examining Board.

 

Other required forms are available for:

 

        Crane Operators

        Crane Operator Apprentice

        Crane Owner Registration

And can be found offsite on the State of Connecticut’s eLicense Website.

 

Hawaii:

 

HOISTING MACHINE OPERATORS ADVISORY BOARD (HMOAB)

To provide public and worker safety, the 1998 Hawaii State Legislature created the Hoisting Machine Operators Advisory Board (HMOAB) to adopt Hawaii Administrative Rules (HAR) for the certification of hoisting machine operators. … Under these rules, certification is required for operators using equipment covered by American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) B30.5 Mobile and Locomotive Cranes, having a lifting capacity of more than one ton and that are used to perform construction work as defined by Section 12-50-2 HAR. The rules require operators to show that they have the experience, training, qualifications and certification to safely operate these hoisting machines.  [more]

 

http://labor.hawaii.gov/hiosh/home/permits-and-certifications/

 

hawaii.gov HMOAB website.

 

LETTER TO CRANE EMPLOYERS – JULY 24, 2019

July 24, 2019

Aloha:

Re: Revised List of Crane Operator Certifying Agencies

You should know that your crane operators must be certified by the State of Hawaii Hoisting Machine Operators Advisory Board (HMOAB) if they perform any kind of construction work.

In order to be certified by the HMOAB, crane operators must provide a current physical examination and a certificate from one of the four agencies listed below:

1.      National Commission for the Certification of Crane Operators (NCCCO);

2.      Electrical Industry Certifications Association (EICA);

3.      National Center for Construction Education & Research (NCCER);

4.      Operating Engineers Certification Program (OECP).

 

Maryland:

 

The State of Maryland does not appear to require both certification and license. The language they use to describe Crane Operator Requirements can be found in the Code of Maryland Regulations (COMAR) under section 09.12.26.06. The language used to describe these requirements is a hybrid cut & paste from NCCCO and Fed OSHA sources. The only place the word “license” appears is at the end of the document referring to the need to be checked-out by a licensed physician.

 

The links provided on the NCCCO website re: Maryland are few and dated. If you study them (esp. the last link from a 2009 article) I think Maryland was added to the list as a way for CCO to toot their own horn and link that article, because the state does not require crane operators to be licensed.

 

According to: Title 09 DEPARTMENT OF LABOR, LICENSING, AND REGULATION Subtitle 12 DIVISION OF LABOR AND INDUSTRY Chapter 26 Crane Safety Authority: Labor and Employment Article, §§2-106(b)(4), 5-104, and 5-312, Annotated Code of Maryland 

 

.06 Crane Operator Requirements:  H. Certification Criteria (I)(2): ‘ A certificate of medical examination as required for a commercial driver's license that would be acceptable to the U.S. Department of Transportation, unless the employee provides documentation from a licensed physician that the failure to meet these qualifications will not affect the individual's operation of a crane.’

 

The only codified reference to crane operators needing to possess a “license” is in relation to having a CDL that will allow them to drive the mobile crane over the road from one job to the next.

According to
Cranes 101: Maryland

Maryland State Hoisting License Requirements

Currently, your state does not mandate a Crane Operator License. Please beware that soon you will need a Crane Operator Certificate to operate a crane

 

 

Massachusetts:

 

According to Cranes 101: Massachusetts

Massachusetts State Hoisting License Requirements

You do need a license MA to operate cranes and heavy equipment. In the state of MA if it lifts over 500lb, 10 feet high or a 1/4 yard of material you need a license. In the state of MA if you hold a 1A license you are also covered to run anything under that license ie: 1B and 1C. The same goes with the 2A license.

 

The license preparation classes allow your employee to be prepared to take the state test they are applying for. These classes not only prepare them to take the state test, they also award the employee with a certificate stating they have had training for that type of equipment.

 

Code of massachusetts regulations - Mass.gov

Bill S.2564 states that:

 

‘Section 53. (a) No person shall operate derricks, cableways, machinery used for discharging cargoes, temporary elevator cars used on excavation work or used for hoisting building material, when the motive power to operate such machinery is mechanical and other than steam, unless such person holds a license or temporary permit as provided in this section. The owner or user of such hoisting machinery shall not operate, or cause to be operated, such machinery, unless the person operating it is duly licensed or possesses a temporary permit.

(b) For licensing and temporary permitting purposes, the commissioner shall classify hoisting machinery by categories, depending on size, weight, common usage, capacity, power source or such other characteristics as the commissioner may find appropriate; provided, however, that at least 1 category shall include cranes and other similar equipment and 1 category shall include excavating equipment.

The commissioner shall adopt rules and regulations under chapter 30A, embodying the classifications of hoisting machinery and establishing criteria and procedures for the issuance, denial, renewal, suspension and revocation of licenses or temporary permits to operate hoisting machinery; provided, however, that a final adjudication that there has been a violation of federal or state occupational safety and health regulations or any other rule adopted by the department, shall be cause for the denial, suspension or revocation of any license or temporary permit issued under this section. Criteria for issuance of such license shall include, but not be limited to, training and experience requirements appropriate to the categories of machinery for which the license is intended. Criteria for issuance of such temporary permit shall include, but not be limited to, training and experience requirements appropriate to the compact equipment for which the permit is intended.’

Massachusetts Contractor Academy

As described here, crane operators are required in the State of Massachusetts to take a set of state administered exams. “The Engineering Division of the Massachusetts Department of Public Safety (DPS) oversees the licensing applications and exams” … and “hoisting licensing is conducted in compliance with Section 520 of the Code of Massachusetts Regulations (CRM), Section 6.0.”

Put simply, hoisting is the use of any of the aforementioned to handle loads that are >500 lbs. or >10 feet or >¼ cubic yard3

Licensing Classifications

The DPS divides hoisting into four (4) separate classifications, each requiring distinct and separate licensing.

        1A – Lattice Cranes

        1B – Telescoping Boom w/ Wire Rope

        1C – Telescoping Boom w/o Wire Rope

        1D – Powered Industrial Fork Truck

The Massachusetts Contractors Academy offers training based on the CRM for each license classification. Although the class names may be slightly different than those classifications, the courses, nonetheless, cover the entirety of the state’s requirements for operators to earn a license in the category of their choosing.

        Hoisting 1A (Derricks / Lattice Cranes) Course

        Hoisting 1B (Telescoping Boom w/cables) Course

        Hoisting 1C (Telescoping Booms w/o cables) Course

        Hoisting 1D (Forklift Safety and Operation) Course

Two things are common to each course: the emphasis on safety and the fact that each course is available for FREE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minnesota:

 

Minnesota Department of Labor and Industry

MINNESOTA OSHA RULEMAKING

MNOSHA proposes to adopt federal regulations

On NNov. 4, 2019, Minnesota OSHA adopted the following federal regulations, as published in the Minnesota State Register on Sept. 3, 2019.

Cranes and Derricks in Construction; Operator Qualification; final rule

     See Cranes and Derricks in Construction; Operator Qualification; final rule

Federal OSHA published a final rule Nov. 9, 2018, in the Federal Register, clarifying requirements for crane operators and maintaining the employer's duty to ensure crane operators can safely operate the equipment. Under the final rule, employers are required to train operators as needed to perform assigned crane activities, evaluate them and document successful completion of the evaluations. Employers that have evaluated operators before Dec. 9, 2018, will not have to conduct those evaluations again, but will only have to document when those evaluations were completed. The rule also requires crane operators to be certified or licensed, and receive ongoing training as necessary to operate new equipment. Operators can be certified based on the crane type and capacity or the crane type only, which ensures more accredited testing organizations are eligible to meet OSHA's certification program requirements. The final rule revises a 2010 requirement that crane operator certification must specify the rated lifting capacity of cranes for which the operator is certified. Compliant certifications that were already issued by type and capacity are still acceptable under this final rule. The final rule is effective at the federal level.

Minnesota OSHA adopted the final rule as published.

Minnesota eLicensing: Crane Operator Certification

Whatever the previous licensure requirements were in the State of Minnesota, three days ago (Nov. 4, 2019) the State adopted Fed OSHA’s Final Rule as issued Nov. 9, 2018 as their new crane operator requirement, deeming that OSHA’s definition of crane operator certification and qualification were acceptable as a means to ensure that crane operators in the State of Minnesota receive the training and preparation they need to operate cranes safely.

PowerPoint on the history of crane certification in the State of Minnesota

 

 

 

 

Montana:

 

Montana Labor and Industry: Rule Chapter 24.135: CRANE AND HOISTING OPERATING ENGINEERS

 

24.135.516 : CRANE HOISTING OPERATORS LICENSE REQUIREMENTS

 

States that:

(1) No person shall operate any crane hoisting equipment except as listed in (9) of this rule without first obtaining a crane hoisting operator's license from the bureau, unless meeting requirements of (7) .”

(2) The following crane hoisting operator's licenses are issued under 50-76-103 , MCA:

(a) first-class crane hoisting;

(b) first-class crane hydraulic hoisting;

(c) first-class crane gantry and trolley;

(d) second-class crane hoisting;

(e) second-class hydraulic and boom truck;

(f) third-class crane oiler;

(g) first-class tower crane;

(h) second-class tower crane; and

(i) air tugger.

 

The Montana Crane and Hoist Operator Program, administered by the Montana Building Codes Bureau exercises several forms of reciprocity for crane licensure. Candidates can (1) “provide a current NCCCO, CIC, OECP or NCCER Certification or Card” displaying certification training at a national level, or (2) “provide verification from other Licensing Agency and Copy of License” at the State or government level, or (3) provide a “Certificate of Experience signed by a person having actual knowledge of the applicant’s past work experience;” — any of which serve as an example of a candidate having received some form of previous training.

 

After receiving evidence of the candidates prior training, along with proof of a current physical dated within the last two years, applicants will be considered for licensure in the State of Montana. Upon gaining state approval, a candidate’s licensure exams with be mailed to a specific job site where they can engage in phase 2 of the licensure process.

 

License renewals can be applied for here.

 

 

Nevada:

 

Official text of regulation: NRS 618.880  Establishment of safety plans and procedures; certification of cranes; certification of operators of tower cranes and mobile cranes; exceptions. [Effective until the date on which the Governor declares that the Federal Government has adopted provisions governing the certification of crane operators.]

 

(a) The Division shall adopt regulations requiring the establishment and implementation of programs for the certification of all persons who operate:

                (1) Tower cranes; or

                (2) Mobile cranes having a usable boom length of 25 feet or greater or a maximum machine rated capacity of 15,000 pounds or greater.

                (b) A person shall not operate a tower crane or mobile crane described in subparagraph (2) of paragraph (a) unless the person holds certification as a crane operator issued pursuant to this subsection for the type of crane being operated.

                (c) An applicant for certification as a crane operator must hold a certificate which:

                (1) Is issued by an organization whose program of certification for crane operators:

               (I) Is accredited by the National Commission for Certifying Agencies or an equivalent accrediting body approved by the Division; or

               (II) Meets other criteria established by the Division; and

                (2) Certifies that the person has met the standards to be a crane operator established by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers in its standards B30.3, B30.4 or B30.5 as adopted by regulation of the Division.

 

Without any language specific to licensing or licensure in crane operation, the State of Nevada has stated for the record that an NCCCO-issued mobile crane certification (or a certification like it that ensures the person has met the standards set forth by American Society of Mechanical Engineers in its standards B30.3, B30.4 or B30.5) is sufficient to operate cranes in the State of Nevada. 

 

However, it is important to note the provision “Effective until the date on which the Governor declares that the Federal Government has adopted provisions governing the certification of crane operators.” With Fed OSHA announcing Nov 9. 2018 that all operators in all 50 states must become nationally certified… the question becomes, has the governor of Nevada released a statement yet recognizing this new law?

 

A study of recent press releases made by the State of Nevada’s Governor’s Office shows that he has not yet made such a statement.

 

New Jersey:

 

The Licensing of Crane Operators Act (N.J.S.A. 45:26-1 et. seq.) and Regulations (N.J.A.C. 12:121) were passed on September 4, 2003, and mandate that persons eligible for licensing as defined in the Act (see Chapter 171, 45:26-8) as an operator of a crane receive and maintain a certification from the National Commission for the Certification of Crane Operators, or an approved equivalent certification program.

 

The Act identifies, establishes fees and grants licenses for crane operators. Described in the regulation and code is the establishment and make-up of the membership for a Crane Operators License Advisory Board. Additionally, the Act specifies criteria for licensure as well as provisions for renewal, revocation and suspension of crane operator licenses.

 

45:26-7. Licensure of crane operators

 

a. No person shall engage in the operation of a crane, offer himself for employment as a crane operator or otherwise act, attempt to act, present or represent himself as a crane operator unless licensed as such under the provisions of this act.

 

b. A crane operator's license shall be valid only in conjunction with a current certification and only in the specialty or specialties for which the crane operator is certified. The specialties are lattice boom crawler crane, lattice boom truck crane, telescopic boom cranes with a capacity of more than 17.5 tons and telescopic boom cranes with a capacity of less than 17.5 tons.

 

45:26-8. Eligibility for licensure as crane operator

To be eligible for a license as a crane operator, an applicant shall fulfill the following requirements:

a. Be at least 18 years of age;

 

b. Receive certification from the National Commission for the Certification of Crane Operators or any other organization found by the board to offer an equivalent testing and certification program meeting the requirements of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers ASME B30.5 and the accreditation requirements of the National Commission for Certifying Agencies;

 

c. Have at least 1,000 hours of crane--related experience; and

 

d. Maintain a current medical examiner's certification card.

 

45:26-9. Application, fee, issuance of license

Upon payment to the commissioner of a fee and the submission of a completed written application provided by the commissioner, the commissioner shall issue a crane operator license to any person who meets the eligibility requirements of section 8 of this act.

In the State of New Jersey, it is necessary to obtain a state-issued license and have that accompany your NCCCO or other NCCA accredited certifier-issued certification card. New Jersey adds a secondary layer of authorization through its own verification that eligible operators have earned a nationally recognized certification. To begin the process, candidates can fill out the application found here

 

New Mexico:

 

In the State of New Mexico, the Regulation and Licensing Department oversees the Crane Operators Safety Program, also known as the Hoisting Program.

 

Overview

The New Mexico Regulation and Licensing Department oversees the crane industry within the state of New Mexico.

All crane operators performing construction, demolition, or excavation work must have a valid and current New Mexico license to operate within the State. The Crane Operators Safety Program recognizes those who have successfully completed a course, based on the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), in order to obtain a New Mexico crane operator license before they can operate cranes in New Mexico. Operators with national accreditation from CIC, OECP, NCCER and NCCCO must also obtain a New Mexico crane operator license before they can operate cranes in New Mexico.

ARTICLE 15 of the Crane Operators Safety Act, section 60-15-4. License required; exemptions. Explains:

 

A. No person shall operate a crane in construction, demolition or excavation work unless the person is licensed under the Crane Operators Safety Act or exempt pursuant to Subsection D of this section.

B. Operating a crane without a license shall be considered unlicensed operation and shall subject the person who is operating the crane and the person's employer, or the employer's representative, to penalties as provided in the Crane Operators Safety Act.

C. The licensee and the licensee's employer shall be subject to applicable regulations controlling the use and operation of cranes as promulgated by the occupational safety and health administration, the mine safety and health administration or the American national standards institute.

D. The Crane Operators Safety Act shall not apply to the operation of a crane used in construction, demolition or excavation associated with:

(1) natural gas gather lines;

(2) interstate transmission facilities and interstate natural gas facilities subject to the federal Natural Gas Pipeline Safety Act of 1968 and its amendments;

(3) interstate pipeline facilities and carbon dioxide pipeline facilities subject to the federal Hazardous Liquid Pipeline Safety Act of 1979;

(4) gas and oil pipeline facilities subject to the Pipeline Safety Act [70-3-11 to 70-3- 20 NMSA 1978];

(5) mining, milling or smelting operations subject to mine safety and health administration regulations or occupational safety and health administration regulations;

(6) prefabricated control rooms of natural gas, oil or carbon dioxide pipeline transmission facilities;

(7) oil and gas exploration, production or drilling;

(8) rural electric cooperative and electric, gas and water utility operations;

(9) commercial sign operations;

(10) the construction or operation of railroads;

(11) the installation and maintenance of telephone or television cable; or

(12) the installation and maintenance of propane tanks.

 

Q: What are the requirements to obtain a license?

All applicants must submit a complete application with the following attached documents: (Click here for the application.).

Training:

      Documentation of successfully completing an approved In-House Training Course and a Nationally Approved Certification;

      Documentation of passing an approved written general examination with a score of 75 percent or greater.

Documentation of passing an approved Law & Safety Examination covering the New Mexico Crane Operators Safety Program Act.

Application:

      Notarized documentation from employers and/or supervisors verifying required experience on the specific crane-types (conventional, hydraulic, and/or tower) for which applying;

      Documentation of passing an approved practical examination on the specific crane-types (conventional, hydraulic, and/or tower) for which applying.

      Note: There is no experience requirement or practical examination requirement for Class III licensure.

      Additional documents can be submitted with the experience. At least 36 months and more and 500 hours of experience within the last 3 years of operating a crane for Class I; Class II 36 months or more and 500 hours of experience within the last 3 years.

Proof of a physical examination within twelve (12) months of the posted date of the application conducted in accordance with U.S. Department of Transportation regulations. A copy of the medical card must be submitted with the application.

Proof of a detailed substance abuse report of the test performed within twelve (12) months of the posted date of the application conducted in accordance with U.S. Department of Transportation regulations.

 

A copy of the Application for Crane Operator License can be found here. A list of approved certification programs that can help operators become certified, thereby completing the first step of the licensing process can be found here.

 

New York:

 

According to the New York State Department of Labor, A Crane Operator Certificate of Competence is required to operate a crane in New York State in connection with construction, demolition and excavation work.  When issued by the Commissioner of Labor, this certificate authorizes operation of cranes anywhere in New York State, outside of the City of New York, and is a state mandated license that both satisfies, and is required by, OSHA's new crane certification standard. The Class A unrestricted license is the only license that allows operation of any type of crane.

The NYS Department of Labor License & Certification Unit administers Operational exams for the following classifications of cranes.

      Class A - Unrestricted – Conventional, cable, lattice boom, and friction are names that have been used in reference to this classification.  This classification includes all cranes having a fixed lattice boom, with or without free fall capability; conventional tower cranes, derricks and all cranes with free fall capability. Class A allows operation of any crane.

      Class B - Hydraulic – This includes all hydraulic cranes which have a telescopic boom and swinging cab; there is no restriction on maximum manufacturer’s rating. This classification also includes smaller trailer or truck mounted self-erecting tower cranes, as well as boom trucks having over 28 ton manufacturer’s rated capacity. Class B allows operation of B, C & D.

      Class C - Boom Truck – This includes cranes having telescopic booms which are generally truck mounted and up to 28 ton maximum manufacturer’s rated capacity. Class C allows operation of C & D.

      Class D - Restricted Boom Truck – These cranes are also referred to as sign hangers, but their use is not restricted to that industry. This includes cranes having telescopic booms which are generally truck mounted and up to 3 ton maximum manufacturer’s rated capacity, and up to 125 feet of boom. Class D allows operation of D only.

      Class E – Reserved.

      Class F - Line Truck – These cranes are also referred to as digger derricks. It is up to 15 ton maximum manufacturer’s rated capacity, 65 foot maximum boom length, utilizing a non-conductive tip with nylon rope, for use in electrical applications only. Class F allows operation of F only.

 

The following crane-related Operational exams are available through the NYS Department of Labor License & Certification Unit:

Class A - Conventional (Unrestricted) Crane Test (open in a new window)

Class B - Hydraulic Crane Test (open in a new window)

Class C - Boom Truck Crane Test (open in a new window)

Class D - Restricted Boom Truck Crane Test (open in a new window)

Class F - Line Truck Crane Test (open in a new window)

 

Pennsylvania:

 

State Board of Crane Operators

The State Board of Crane Operators regulates the practice, licensure and registration of crane operators in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in order to safeguard life, health and property.  The Board also registers trainees.  The functions of the Board include investigating, approving or disapproving crane operator applications for those desiring to be licensed in Pennsylvania.

CRANE OPERATOR LICENSURE ACT

Section 501. Licensure. 63 P.S. § 2400.501

(a) General rule.--Except as provided in subsection (c), an individual may not operate a crane, offer himself for employment as an individual who may operate a crane or hold himself out as a crane operator unless licensed by the board.

(b) Business entities.--Except as provided in subsection (c), an individual, corporation, partnership, firm or other entity shall not employ an individual to operate a crane or allow or direct an individual to operate a crane unless the individual is licensed under this act.

(c) Trainee.--For purposes of acquiring the experience necessary to obtain certification, a trainee who has passed a written examination of the National Commission for the Certification of Crane Operators or of a national association deemed equivalent by the board may operate a crane when under the immediate supervision of a crane operator. In order to qualify as a trainee under this subsection, the individual must be 18 years of age or older and have demonstrated, to the satisfaction of the person employing the crane operator, that the trainee is physically capable of operating a crane.

(d) Duty of crane operator.--When providing immediate supervision to a trainee pursuant to subsection (c), the crane operator shall have no other duties.

(e) Title.--An individual who holds a license as a crane operator or is maintained on inactive status pursuant to section 504(b) shall have the right to use the title “licensed crane operator” and the abbreviation “L.C.O.” No other individual shall use the title “licensed crane operator” or the abbreviation “L.C.O.” Except as provided in subsection (c), no other individual shall hold himself out as being able to operate a crane or being authorized to operate a crane.

(f) Additional requirement.--A license to operate a crane shall be valid only in conjunction with certification if the licensee maintains a current certification in the specialty for which the crane operator is certified.

Online Licensing Services

 

Crane operators in the State of Pennsylvania are required to apply for a license in addition to their certification. In order to do that, operators need to contact the Pennsylvania State Board of Crane Operators (the board also registers trainees). Operators that are interested in becoming licensed in the state of Pennsylvania can also visit the NCCCO website; click the link provided to fill in some of the reporting details to help make the process easier.

 

 

Rhode Island:

 

According to Cranes101,

 

Rhode Island State Hoisting License Requirements

You do need a State issued license to operate a crane in RI. Below are links that will help direct you to the proper application. RI license preparation classes allow your employee to be prepared to take their state test they are applying for. These classes not only prepare them to take the state test, it also awards the employee with a certificate stating they have had training for that type of equipment.

 

According to operatorhq.com,

 

Rhode Island Hoisting License Application and Requirements

If you are a crane operator or a hosting equipment operator in construction who wants to work in Rhode Island, you must hold a valid license specific to the type/class of crane or equipment you want to operate.

Here is the application procedure you need to do:

  1. Get a copy of the hoisting engineer application form for test application. Download a copy here. Complete the form and submit it to the Department of Labor and Training, Professional Regulation Unit, PO Box 20247, Cranston, RI 02920-0943.

  2. Make sure that you filled up all required details on the form. The application will be returned to you if there are incomplete information.

  3. Complete all the requirements. The requirements are listed below. For further details and particulars about the application, please refer to the application form.

  4. Find a suitable date when you want to take the exams. You can see the schedule here. The exam schedule is three (3) times a week, during Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday. Since the exams are on a first, first serve basis and that the number of examinees that can be accommodated is limited, you need to enlist as early as possible for you to be able to meet the date when you want to take it.

  5. The tests are being administered at the RI Department of Labor and Training, Building 73-1, Conference Room, 1511 Pontiac Avenue, Cranston, RI 02920-0943

Here are the requirements you need to have for the application:

        Valid and government-issued identification such as your driver license, social security card, passport, etc.

        Application fee of $75.00 (as of this writing) is needed for the application to be processed. The payment can be in form of a check or money order, it should be payable to the RI Department of Labor and Training.

        A notarized detailed statement showing all your education, experience and training you’ve taken on hoisting equipment. If you are employed, the statement should be on the company letterhead signed by the employer, while, if you are a self-employed, you, the applicant must signed it.

        Copy of a valid medical certificate issued by the DOT.

        Make sure you submit all the requirements; otherwise, the application will not be processed and returned to you.

 

State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations RI Department of Labor and Training Division of Workforce Regulation and Safety, Professional Regulations Unit      Hoisting Engineers Application

 

RULES AND REGULATIONS FOR EXAMINING AND LICENSING OF HOISTING ENGINEERS

 

 

Utah:

 

Utah State Legislature

 

58-55-504.  Crane operators -- Required certification -- Penalty for violation.

 

S.B. 92 Certification of Crane Operators

 

(2) In order to operate a crane on commercial construction projects, an individual shall

             45      be certified as a crane operator by the National Commission for the Certification of Crane

             46      Operators or any other organization determined by the division to offer an equivalent testing

             47      and certification program that meets the requirements of the American Society of Mechanical

             48      Engineers ASME B 30.5 and the accreditation requirements of the National Commission for

             49      Certifying Agencies.

 

Crane Operator Certification Requirements in Utah On February 8, 2011 Utah Occupational Safety and Health (UOSH) adopted the Federal Standard for Cranes and Derricks in Construction, part CC of 29 CFR 1926 and 29 CFR 1926.1400 -1442. This OSHA crane rule became effective in Utah August 8, 2011. The current certification requirements of the Utah Department of Professional Licensing (DOPL) exempts certain construction activities from crane operator certification including, single family detached housing, multifamily attached housing up to and including a fourplex, and commercial construction of not more than two stories above ground. The provisions of 29 CFR 1926.1427, related to operator qualification and certification. will become effective November 10. 2014. After that date, ALL CONSTRUCTION CRANE OPERATORS must be certified. This OSHA standard adopted in Utah applies to the entire construction industry and all types of construction work without exception. OSHA has published a booklet entitled, “Small Entity Compliance Guide for the Final Rule for Cranes and Derricks in Construction”, OSHA publication 3433-06, 2011. You can order copies of this publication by calling 1800-321-6742 or visiting their website at www.osha.gov. For further information about how to comply with this standard in Utah, please contact UOSH Compliance at 801-530-6901 or UOSH Consultation at 801-530-6855. For information about acceptable certification providers, please contact the Utah Department of Professional Licensing, Bureau 4 at 801-536-3039, or visit their website at www.dopl.utah.gov

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Washington:

 

The State of Washington has one of the most well-defined crane operator licensure processes.

 

Official text of the regulation:

 

NEW SECTION. Sec. 5. A new section is added to chapter 49.17 RCW 18 to read as follows: 19 (1) Except for training purposes as provided in subsection (3) of 20 this section, an employer or contractor shall not permit a crane 21 operator to operate a crane unless the crane operator is a qualified 22 crane operator. 23 (2) The department shall establish, by rule, requirements that must 24 be met to be considered a qualified crane operator. In establishing 25 rules, the department shall consult nationally recognized crane 26 standards for crane operator certification. The rules must include, at 27 a minimum, the following: 28 (a) The crane operator must have a valid crane operator 29 certificate, for the type of crane to be operated, issued by a crane 30 operator testing organization accredited by a nationally recognized 31 accrediting agency which administers written and practical 32 examinations, has procedures for recertification that enable the crane 33 operator to recertify at least every five years, and is recognized by 34 the department; 35 (b) The crane operator must have up to two thousand hours of 36 documented crane operator experience, which meets experience levels p. 5 ESHB 2171 1 established by the department for crane types and capacities by rule; 2 and 3 (c) The crane operator must pass a substance abuse test conducted 4 by a recognized laboratory service.

 

Washington State Dept. of Labor and Industries language on construction cranes:

 

Washington State Legislature on: Operator qualifications and certification. (+) PDF version

 

(1) Prior to operating any crane covered under chapter 296-155 WAC, Part L, with the exception of the trainee/apprentice requirements outlined in subsection (2) of this section and those cranes exempt in WAC 296-155-52900(3), you must ensure that the operator meets the following requirements:

(a) Has a valid crane operator certificate, for the type of crane to be operated, issued by a crane operator testing organization which has an accredited program, accredited by a nationally recognized accrediting agency. The operator certification must include a successful passing of a written and practical examination for each crane category listed in Table 3 and by crane type for mobile cranes.

(b) A determination through a written test that:

(i) The individual knows the information necessary for safe operation of the specific type of crane/derrick the individual will operate, including all of the following:

(A) The controls and operational/performance characteristics.

(B) Use of, and the ability to calculate, load/capacity information on a variety of configurations of the crane/derrick.

(C) Procedures for preventing and responding to power line contact.

(D) Technical knowledge similar to the subject matter criteria listed in WAC 296-155-56420 of this part applicable to the specific type of crane/derrick the individual will operate. Use of WAC 296-155-56420 criteria meets the requirements of this provision.

(E) Technical knowledge applicable to:

(I) The suitability of the supporting ground and surface to handle expected loads.

(II) Site hazards.

(III) Site access.

(F) This part, including applicable incorporated materials.

(ii) The individual is able to read and locate relevant information in the equipment manual and other materials containing information referred to in (i) of this subsection.

(c) A determination through a practical test that the individual has the skills necessary for safe operation of the crane/derrick, including the following:

(i) Ability to recognize, from visual and auditory observation, the items listed in WAC 296-155-53405(2).

(ii) Operational and maneuvering skills.

(iii) Application of load chart information.

(iv) Application of safe shut-down and securing procedures.

Notes:

• An operator's certificate issued by the accredited testing agency is valid for a 5-year period, and must be renewed to ensure operators maintain qualified operator status.

 

• For self-erecting tower cranes, the department will accept a tower crane certification issued by a nationally accrediting testing agency.

 

• For derricks, the department will accept, at a minimum, a lattice boom truck or crawler mobile crane operator's certificate.

 

• An operator will be deemed qualified to operate a crane if the operator is certified under (a) of this subsection for the type and capacity of the crane or for higher-capacity crane of the same type.

(d) If there is no accredited written or practical test for operator certification available, you must ensure the operator has been completely trained, evaluated and tested by you on the operating procedures for the piece of equipment in use as recommended by the crane/equipment manufacturer and the applicable ASME standard. This process must be documented and made available upon request.

(e) Has crane hours of experience as shown in Table 3; and

(f) Pass a substance abuse test conducted by a recognized laboratory.

 

 

 

West Virginia:

 

The State of West Virginia is unique in that it is the only state that requires its crane operators to become NCCCO certified. In May 2012 the state ruled that only certification organizations that have been accredited at a national level by ANSI are considered an acceptable form of crane operator certification. This put NCCCO in front of other certification issuers that have not had their program(s) accredited by ANSI. Another prominent national accreditation body (NCCA) filed an appeal seeking “equivalency status”but their appeal was dismissed.

 

WEST VIRGINIA CODE CHAPTER 21 LABOR

 

ARTICLE 3D CRANE OPERATOR CERTIFICATION ACT

States that:

 

§21-3D-2. Certification required; exemptions.

 

(a) A person may not operate a crane or tower crane without certification issued under this article except for those persons exempted under subsection (b) of this section.

 

(b) A person is not required to obtain certification under this article if the person:

 

2

 

(1) Is a member of the Department of Defense or Armed Forces of the United States or an employee of the United States, when such member or employee is engaged in the work of a crane operator exclusively for such governmental unit; or   (2) Is primarily an operator of farm machinery who is performing the work of a crane operator as part of an agricultural operation; or

 

(3) Is operating a crane on an emergency basis; or

 

(4) Is operating a crane for personal use and not for profit on the site of real property which the person owns or leases; or

 

(5) Is an Operator-in-Training under the direct supervision of a certified crane operator and:

 

(A) Who is enrolled in an industry recognized in-house training course based on the American National Standards Institute Standards for Crane Operators and who is employed by the entity that either taught the training course or contracted to have the training course taught, all of which is approved by the commissioner; or

 

(B) Who is enrolled in an apprenticeship program or training program for crane operators approved by the United States Department of Labor, Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training;

 

(6) Is an employee of and operating a crane at the direction of any manufacturing plant or other industrial establishment, including any mill, factory, tannery, paper or pulp mill, mine, colliery, breaker or mineral processing operation, quarry, refinery or well or is an employee of and operating a crane at the direction of the person, firm or corporation who owns or is operating such plant or establishment;

 

(7) Is an employee of a public utility operating a crane to perform work in connection with facilities used to provide a public service under the jurisdiction of the Public Service Commission, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission or Federal Communications Commission; or

 

(8) Is operating timbering harvesting machinery associated with the production of timber and the manufacturing of wood products.

 

 

 

 

It goes on to state that the Commissioner of the Department of Labor is responsible for establishing the criteria for the creation of crane operator evaluation, approval and issuance of certification status. It details eligibility requirements and sorts crane operators into two groups: Class A and Class B.

 

§21-3D-4. Minimum certification requirements.

 

(a) The commissioner shall certify an applicant who:

 

(1) Is at least eighteen years of age;

 

(2) Meets the application requirements as prescribed by rule;

 

(3) Passes the written examination; 

 

(4) Passes the practical demonstration: Provided, That the practical demonstration approved by the commissioner may be administered on-site by a qualified company representative;                   

 

(5) Presents the original, or a photographic copy, of a physician's certificate that he or she is physically qualified to drive a commercial motor vehicle as required by 49 C.F.R. §391.41, as of the effective date of this article or an equivalent physician's certificate as approved by the commissioner; and

 

(6) Pays the appropriate fees.

 

(b) Certification issued under this article is valid throughout the state and is not assignable or transferable, and is valid for one year from the date on which it was issued.

 

(c) Notwithstanding any other provision of this article to the contrary, the commissioner shall establish a dual classification system of certification as follows:

 

(1) Class A certification, which will provide eligibility for national certification, and for which the applicant must achieve a passing score of seventy on the national commission for the certification of crane operators written examination;

 

(2) Class B certification, for which the commissioner may accept a lesser score on the national commission for the certification of crane operators written examination: Provided, That this score may not be less than sixty for Class B certification. 

 

(d) On and after November 10, 2014:

 

(1) All individuals who operate cranes in the State of West Virginia which are governed by the provisions of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration of the United States Department of Labor, 29 C.F.R. §1926.1400, Subpart CC, are required to hold a Class A certification; and

 

 (2) All individuals who operate cranes in the State of West Virginia which are not governed by any provision of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration of the United States Department of Labor are required to hold a Class B certification.

LEGISLATIVE RULE TITLE 42 WEST VIRGINIA DIVISION OF LABOR

 

SERIES 24 CRANE OPERATOR CERTIFICATION ACT

 

Details the entire timeline of the process and provides operators with what they need to do in order to meet the State of West Virginia’s requirements. Additional instructions and explanations of the process can be found here at the West Virginia Division of Labor website. This is also where operators can go to download the required forms to apply for licensed status with the state.

 

And…

 

LEGISLATIVE RULE TITLE 42  WEST VIRGINIA DIVISION OF LABOR

 

SERIES 25 CRANE OPERATOR CERTIFICATION ACT  PRACTICAL EXAMINATION

 

Provides details regarding the practical exams that operators must pass in order to receive licensed status in addition to being certified.

 

 

City Licensing Requirements

 

Chicago:

 

In addition to certification at a national level, the City of Chicago requires its operators to pass the Chicago Crane Operator's Examination. Details related to what that examination includes and which type of cranes require it can be found online in their study guide.

 

Some of the City of Chicago requirements are stronger than those presented by NCCCO. For example, one of CCO’s core questions asks “what is the minimum number of wire rope wraps that must remain on the hoist drum?” The correct answer being two. But here we see in this sample question from the Chicago Crane Operator’s Examination that the correct answer must be at least 3 wraps or more, as three is the lowest number of wraps available as an answer:

 

1. Which of the following best describes the minimum requirement for wire anchorage on a hoist drum?

 

A. At least three wraps when the load block is at its lowest position

B. At least four wraps when the load block is at its highest position

C. At least five wraps when the load block is at its lowest position

D. At least six wraps when the load block is at its highest position

 

-          Study Guide page 6

 

Operators seeking to better understand Chicago’s crane operator licensure process can refer to their F.A.Q. online.

 

Cincinnati:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Orleans:

New York City:

Omaha:

Philadelphia:

Washington DC:

 

 

 

 

 

 

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